THE NEW YORKER ON WALKING


WALKING


Oone of the standouts articles I've read on the New Yorker wasin September 2014. It was titled "Why walking helps us think."

Before even starting to read the article I said to myself, "Well, of course, it does!".  Little did I know I was about to get schooled. As The New Yorker does, it elegantly explains the who, why and hows. Warning the first paragraph is a mouth full and mainly discussed maps used in novels. Feel free to skip straight to the second.

I am doing it a disservice by giving you a summation the article, so please read it. Let call this my way of trapping you, so you follow the link and have a good day! Walking is not only good for our physical health, but it is also excellent for our creative mental health.

“How vain it is to sit down to write when you have not stood up to live!” - Henry David Thoreau

The chemical changes in our body while we walk with the freedom our mind has to wonder while we walk in a serene environment is fertile grown for creative thinking. Not to be confused with laser-focused thinking. The article goes on to share a study done on students and the finding from those who were given a test without a walk before and those with a walk after were significantly different.

Now, I know most of us don't live in beautiful scenic neighborhoods where whimsy awaits. To that, I say, "Challenge accepted! Let's move this party." We've all traveled for less, see craving for that Thai place across town or having to go to Costo to stock up on toothpaste. Shouldn't we take our mental health with such urgency as well? Hey, you can even pick up Thai on the way back.

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